Paul Deschanel
1920 - 1920

Official portrait: Paul Deschanel
Portrait officiel de Paul Deschanel
© La Documentation française. Photo Présidence de la République

13 February 1855
Paul Deschanel was born in Schaerbeek-les-Bruxelles.

1873
He earned a degree in the Arts.

1875
He earned a degree in Law. He published his first article on Rabelais in La Revue Bleue.

1876
He worked as private secretary to the Minister of the Interior, Émile de Marcère.

1877
He worked as secretary to the Prime Minister, Jules Simon. He published his first article in Le Journal des Débats, sur Edgar Quinet.

1879
He was the Sub-Prefect of Brest.

April 1881
He was the Prefect of Meaux.

August, 1881
He lost the general election in Dreux.

March 1885
He visited Germany.

1885-1919
He served as Deputy for the Department of Eure-et-Loir.

1887
He visited North Africa.

1892
He visited the United States. He was a member of the Parliamentary Inquiry Committee regarding the Panama Scandal.

June 1898
He was elected President of the Chamber of Deputies. He was defeated the following year by Léon Bourgeois.

18 May 1899
He was elected member of the Académie Française.

13 February 1901
He married Germaine Brice de Viele.

December 1908
A vote was held to abolish capital punishment and executions.

April 1912
He visited the Balkans.

1912-1920
He was elected President of the Chamber of Deputies.

14 March 1914
He was elected member of the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences.

17 January 1920
He was elected President of the Republic.

March 1920
He started to show the first signs of mental health problems.

21 September 1920
He announced his resignation to the Parliament in a message.

22 September 1920
He left the Élysée Palace and was hospitalized.

December 1920
He recovered and attended several sessions of the Institute.

December 1920
He was appointed Sub-Prefect of Dreux.

9 January 1921
He served as Senator for the Department of Eure-et-Loir.

1922
He replaced Raymond Poincaré on the Senate’s Foreign Affairs Committee.

28 April 1922
He died in Paris.

Raymond Poincaré

Raymond Poincaré

Alexandre Millerand

Alexandre Millerand